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List specific brochures

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(Pictured: Victim Support Researcher, Dr Petrina Hargrave)

The justice system must move beyond a “tick-box” culture and begin offering genuine justice for victims, according to research released by Victim Support today.

The key message from Victim Support’s research Victims’ Voices: The Justice Needs and Experiences of New Zealand Serious Crime Victims is that victims need to know that they genuinely matter in our justice system, said Victim Support Researcher Dr Petrina Hargrave.

In-depth interviews with serious crime victims revealed that only 32% felt justice had been served and 41% had faith in the justice system. This was despite 86% of research participants’ cases resulting in a guilty verdict for the offender, and 52% resulting in imprisonment.

“We can’t assume justice has been served just because an offender has been found guilty or a hefty sentence has been handed down,” said Dr Hargrave.

“Justice for victims is just as much about how an outcome is reached as it is about the outcome itself.”

Dr Hargrave said victims commonly felt their opportunity to participate in court was tokenism, and that they lacked genuine opportunities to tell their stories, to be heard, and to have the impact of the crime acknowledged.

Victims were often unable to express the true impact of the crime in their victim impact statements because of restrictive court processes.

“If victims lack trust and confidence in the justice system, they are less likely to report crime, so victims’ experience of the justice system is absolutely critical for crime prevention.”

Dr Hargrave said victims described justice as a set of values including fairness, accountability and righting the wrong.

“Whatever reforms are made to our justice system, we have to get the basics right first. The starting point has to be a commitment to understanding victims’ needs and what justice means to them.”

Dr Hargrave said that while most victims were highly satisfied with the support from individuals and support agencies, there was an urgent need for support to be found within the justice system as a whole.

“We’d like to challenge all players in the justice system to do more than tick boxes for victims.

“With improved education about what matters to victims, we can promote empathy and a genuineness currently lacking in the system that will improve victims’ trust, confidence, and wellbeing.

“The bare minimum requirement of a justice system must be that the public has faith in it to protect them and to deliver justice.”

Victim Support’s research builds on growing evidence that victims need to be at the heart of justice reforms, including:

For the full report click here

Editor’s note:

Summary of Victims’ Voices: The Justice Needs and Experiences of New Zealand Serious Crime Victims key findings and conclusions:

  • The current justice system is failing to deliver justice to victims and is eroding their faith in it.
  • Victims’ definitions of justice are more a set of values rather than an outcome, but these are largely absent from the current system.
  • Victims face barriers of fear (including for safety and that justice will not be served); exclusion (including perceptions of having no voice and that the court system is dehumanising); and unfairness (including perceptions the justice system is offender-centred; the sentence is not commensurate with the crime; lack of offender accountability, responsibility and acknowledgement; and financial hardship).
  • Victims’ procedural justice needs (the fairness of the process by which an outcome is reached) are not consistently met in the justice system.
  • Victims identified support as the most important justice need. While most victims were highly satisfied with the support from individuals and support agencies, there is an urgent need for support to be found within the justice system as a whole.
  • Underpinning these barriers and unmet needs is a perception among victims that the justice system does not genuinely care about them.

Related media release 4 March 2019: http://victimsupport.org.nz/victims-lack-faith-in-justice-system-shows-study/

About Victim Support:

Victim Support is an independent charitable organisation which offers free practical and emotional support to victims of crime and trauma throughout New Zealand. In 2018/19 it helped more than 39,000 victims in the immediate aftermath of crime and trauma, through the court process and beyond.


The following Victim Support handouts are available in foreign languages.  Click the image to download.

    
    
  

 


Victim Support has a futher range of helpful material, located here.

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